image1

Judas Pig - Fact or Fiction?

A man who goes by many names - Horace Silver, Billy Abrahams and Jimmy Holmes to name but a few. As many pseudonyms as possibilities of his fate and authenticity.

This explosive first novel from a reformed career criminal comes with authenticity stamped throughout and blows all the other so-called crime books out of the water. 'The Essex Boys ' Don't make Horace laugh. Sounds like one of them knock-off Chippendale striptease acts that performs in working mens clubs and bingo halls. Some Muscle-Marys drive to a supposed drug meet on an unlit country road and get their nuts blown off. JUDAS PIG is the real deal, written by someone who lived the life, not the lie. This is a man who has had a contract hanging over him for twenty years and ain't dead yet. By contrast his enemies seem cursed. One has not long ago been publicly humilated having lost a multi-million pound lawsuit and now faces financial ruin. The same man's former solicitor was also struck off by The Law Society. Also, two men hired to kill the author are both dead. One by 'natural causes' while another was shot dead outside a pub in east London. Meanwhile, a third man, a treacherous little toerag by the name of Gary 'Tichy' Oxley, will probably die in prison after being sentenced to life for the gangland murder of Joey Oliffe in 2009. The author awaits with expectant anticipation to see what tragedy or misfortune befalls the remaining bottom-feeding scavangers feasting on the leftovers in this sordid swamp. And unlike other supposed gangsters, you won't ever catch Horace Silver standing on nightclub doors in a penguin suit, or following criminals around with his tongue hanging out, and a bulge in his trousers. Fact: Having your picture taken with gangsters don't make you a gangster. If it did then surely Barbara Windsor would be the most feared woman in London.


The follow up to Judas Pig; The Charity Committee was banned for years because of legal action from a person it featured in the book, but finally a high court judge ruled against him because there wasn't enough evidence to show he was a crime lord and the book has reappeared. Although printed for a limited run, it reached the hardened fans of the first book. 

"A criminal who makes a very good living from violence"-T

More Trouble For Some?

The Charity Committee - Horace Silver

THE CHARITY COMMITTE WAS RE-WRITTEN BY THE AUTHOR IN JULY 2013, USING THE REAL NAMES OF THE BOOK'S MAIN PROTAGONISTS. THE RIGHTS WERE THEN SOLD TO AN AMERICAN PUBLISHING COMPANY IN THE SAME MONTH. IT IS BELIEVED THAT AROUND 3750 PAPERBACK COPIES WERE PRINTED. SINCE THAT DATE THE AUTHOR HAS HAD NO FINANCIAL OR OTHER INTEREST IN THE CHARITY COMMITTEE, AND THEREFORE IS UNABLE TO COMMENT ON RUMOURS, THAT THE PAPERBACK VERSION OF THE BOOK IS NOW AVAILABLE IN BOOKSHOPS IN LONDON AND DUBLIN.

A THIRD BOOK BY THE AUTHOR WILL BE RELEASED SOMETIME IN THE FUTURE.

image2

PRAIRIE FLOWER BY Ryan Simms

Upstairs at the Gatehouse.

Danny “Longdog” O’Halloran, in some trusted circles also known as Skinny Dan, born in 1936 , died in July 2005 is the subject of this play. He was a member of London gangland. A personal friend of Charlie Wilson and a mate of “Mad” Frankie Fraser. A contemporary of the Great Train Robbers and during the time of the Krays.


This play is by his son Ryan Simms. A young man who, to his father’s horror decided to go into acting. Dan was very much against him following in his father’s footsteps and becoming a villain. He wanted his son to be respectable - a straight goer, working a trade or even in an office. 


But Ryan was fascinated in the life story of his father and wanted to play the role of his father and tell the story without making him a hero. Danny may have been a thief and a murderer, but he was a thief and a murderer with a high level of old school values - integrity and a sense of morals. But, even with the tools of his trade being shot guns and knives, to his son Ryan, he was just Dad.


Danny got into crime at a very early age, making his way robbing banks, fighting with his contemporaries, leading into murder. He knew the Krays and the first few minutes of the show outlines his experiences with them. However, unlike the infamous Kray twins, he was not part of the glamorous gangster set. He robbed banks for a living and kept out of the limelight. As a family friend once said, “The limelight is for those that are either too tired or didn’t get the job done right”.


Prairie Flower is what “Longdog” called his wife, Ryan’s mother, fashioned after his love of western pictures. Indeed, he refers to Clint Eastwood’s spaghetti westerns including The Good, The Bad and the Ugly – which could easily be the title of this piece.


The show is in two parts and the second part is about his experiences in prison serving a ten year sentence and in solitary for three months. That meant living with electric light on night and day, sleeping in a cold cell ridden with cockroaches, no books, no paper to write on no pens. All he could do was sit and think and later to tell his tale to his son Ryan.


In two hours we learn of Ryan’s old man’s life of – sometimes violent – crime. Although he was a family man and loved his wife, we discover he also had a dark side and the last thing he wanted was his son to become was a poncey actor.


The secret of storytelling is to engage your audience, and, unlike in the States, it’s not always about winning. As any Irish storyteller worth their Guinness will tell you, it’s the way you tell ’em. And Ryan with his director have developed a style that not only engages the audience but also takes them on a journey to yesterday.This is theatrical performance produced and shown as it was meant to be - raw, edgy, realistic and above all - truthful. It’s just two chairs and lights that can only be on or off.


Ryan learnt his acting skills from the poor School and Paul Caister, the founder of this institution helped Ryan to develop the script and directs the play. Caister shares the stage playing himself, sitting on another chair. 


Many have said it’s a loss to the community as the Poor School has since closed – especially since we seem to be going back to the pre-Angry Young Man days of “posh” actors. Or perhaps that’s just a trend. 

Ryan Simms, son of Danny O'Halloran

Ryan Simms, son of Danny O'Halloran

Brian Anderson

"I've shot more people than Al Capone" - Brian Anderson

Self styled, home grown and respected as much within the criminal fraternity as the music elites. Glaswegian native Brian Anderson has sought and gained the headlines with his artistic and daring skill behind the lens. 


LONDON GANGSTER 


ERIC MASON - LONDON GANGSTER 


ARMED ROBBER / KRAY ASSOCIATE / LAST MAN TO BE FLOGGED WITH CAT-O-NINE TAILS IN BRITAIN LEGENDARY CRIMINAL 

Brian's latest release  -  

London Gangster. The Photography Of Brian Anderson - Words By Jeff Maso

Brian's latest release - London Gangster. The Photography Of Brian Anderson - Words By Jeff Maso